WHERE ARE THE JOBS?

How do you find your ideal employer?

Finding a job through Internet searches can be both daunting and time-consuming.  It’s easier if you feel in control.

First, where do you want to work?  Target a geographic radius from your home.

  • How far are you willing to commute?
  • Are you willing to relocate? And would you relocate at your own expense?
  • Are you willing to travel in a job?
  • How much income do you need to cover your lifestyle?
  • Define your dream job

 

Research companies in your target zip codes.

Resources can include:

  • Professional and personal networks
  • Job boards
  • Internet sites such as LinkedIn
  • Employment Development Department (EDD) for your state
  • Vocational organizations
  • Staffing agencies
  • Outplacement agencies
  • Alumni associations
  • Professional associations
  • Niche industry focus group
  • Professional publications

 

Short Cut:

Who do you know who can hand walk your resume to a hiring manager?

 


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Organizing for a Job Search

 

JOB SEEKERS

It’s prudent to keep a “Career Spreadsheet” in Excel or another software program.

TRACK:

  • Dates you upload your résumé and refresh to on-line job boards
  • Dates you send your résumé to recruiters
  • Dates and feedback from all phone and in-person interviews
  • Dates you directly apply to companies via corporate HR Web sites
  • Contacts you have met through networking events

Keep track of all dates.  When you submit your résumé directly to a corporate database, there may be a period of time which must pass before you can be represented by an outside recruiter.

Be sure to keep your job search documentation in one place.

Who Am I Professionally?

The number one question for success during a  job search is:


“Who am I professionally?”

  • If I could have any job I wanted, what would that be?
  • What are my unique talents?
  • How can these talents solve key frustrations of an employer?
  • Am I happier in a smaller environment or large corporation?
  • What are the qualities of my ideal manager?
  • Where would I like to be professionally in five years?

Begin with the end in mind.    Knowing what’s important to you professionally is the key to securing your perfect job.

Holiday Networking!

For every $10 thousand you’d like to earn, it can take up to a month of search. Whether planning a lateral career move, a transition to the next level of the professional ladder, or finding your first job out of college, the band-width and quality of your network will make the difference in how long your search will take and how close your new position will match the job of your dreams.

 

In building a maintaining a professional network, relationships will always set you apart from your competition. Expand your professional network by joining industry specific organizations, as well as special interest groups.
The holidays are an outstanding time to connect with friends and potential employers.  There are holiday events in every industry.   Allow the  luck factor of being in the right place at the right time.

Show up and enjoy!

5 Power Tools to Find a Job Now

Recent statistics say that there are about 10 candidates for every one position. Although the employment report is grim, there are still jobs out there.    What can you do to stand out and land THE job?

As a staffing professional and career consultant, I’ve worked with hundreds of hiring managers and thousand of candidates.  Here’s what works today:

1. The power of your personal professional network

Nothing is better than a personal referral.   If you haven’t done so yet, start telling people that you are now “in transition” and seeking your next opportunity.  And know that being in “transition” is not déclassé – it’s actually much more common than you think.

What to do first?  Update your on-line profiles and start showing up at professional events around town.  Reach out to associates from your past.  Ask people to keep you in mind.  Be visible!

When you’re looking for a job, you’re really in sales and the product you’re selling is you!    Read up on sales skills and interviewing techniques.  Know where you are in the process.

Take the initiative to circle back with everyone in your network on a periodic basis.  Relationships are important and there’s nothing worse than being a fair weather friend.  If you’re going to reach out and ask people for help, then take responsibility for circling back with your network regularly – even after you get the new job.

2. The power of social networking

Increase your sphere of influence. On-line social networking sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook allow you visibility and access.  Be searchable.  Update your profile with key words to reflect a mini resume so that recruiters can find you.   Start linking with as many people and groups as you can, especially on the business profile sites.

Open a personal email account which you only use for job hunting for the rest of your career and  keep a personal business card.

Own your power when applying on-line to corporate websites:

The Internet is the best tool ever for job hunters.  When possible, don’t submit your resume through the job boards.  Look for someone in your personal or on-line network who can introduce you to a manager in the company.   Reach out.

3.  The Power of Focus

Focus your energy.  You can waste hours trolling the web.  Only apply to jobs which fit your skills, background and interests.  This will increase your likelihood of success.

Recruiters work on many searches at the same time.  When submitting your resume, make good use of the subject line.   Say in the subject line: PERFECT FIT for XYZ position –  DIANNE GUBIN.    You will get the call.

You can make it easy for recruiters and hiring managers to remember you.  Attach to your resume to all correspondence.

4. The Power of Volunteering

NOW is always an outstanding time to grow your network.  Every professional and non-profit association needs volunteers.  Raise your hand, show up early and be visible.  You’ll have the opportunity to exercise your talents and people will get to know you in a different light.

5. The Power of Thought

Remember the power of intention and expectation.  While networking and interviewing, INTEND and EXPECT positive outcomes.   See your self working in the company where you’re interviewing.  See yourself clicking with the hiring managers and the team.  See yourself working at this new job every day.  Think your way into a new story and watch it unfold.

Apply these Power Tools for your career and watch your new job unfold.